From ice trials to Jason operations to STEM SEAS to the NPRB Arctic Program, the R/V Sikuliaq has facilitated a lot of adventure since it began scientific operations in 2015.

As someone preparing to communicate the work done on an upcoming Sikuliaq cruise, I wanted to know how onboard outreach was done in the past, and in the process learn more about the still-early history of the ship. I found myself down a googling rabbit hole clicking through handfuls of websites, blogs, and YouTube videos, and started to put together a list.

That list is below, with the hope that it will be helpful to future Sikuliaq communicators, or anyone interested in what cool stuff has previously been done on the ship. Feel free to comment below if you know of other outreach content I’ve missed!

Trip blogs:

Arctic Odyssey: Voyages of the R/V Sikuliaq, which covers Sikuliaq activities from October 2013 to April 2015.

  • Most of the entries are written by Roger Topp, Head of Exhibits, Design and Digital Media at the University of Alaska Museum of the North (UAMN). Entries cover the UAMN Sikuliaq exhibit, equipment testing at the Seward Marine Center, the commissioning ceremony in Seward, and ice trials in the Bering Sea.

 

Jurassic Magnetism: Expedition to the Pacific from December 16, 2014 to January 15, 2015 with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) posted by Aric Velbel.

  • The cruise deployed the AUV Sentry in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM) to the west of the main Hawaiian Islands in the Emperor Seamount Chain.

 


 

Pacific cruise on the Sikuliaq” and “Site one!” posted November 2014 from the same expedition with WHOI

  • Posted on a personal blog called “a spoonful of ginger”. The blog was last updated in 2015.

 


 

ArcticMix Blog from August 2015 to September 2015 led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) and University of Washington. Posts by Thomas Moore, with videos by Faith Haney of Transect Films.

 


 

STEM SEAS Sikuliaq Water Diary, written by students in the “Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Student Experiences Aboard Ships” program in August 2016.

  • 13 posts each written by different students. Includes interviews with the crew.

 


 

Dynamic Arctic (This blog!) about Oregon State University, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and University of Alaska Fairbanks late season research in September 2016 and August 2017

  • Outreach included other social media channels like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
  • September 2016 cruise by Kim Kenny (me) and Jil Callaghan (6th grade teacher at Houck Middle School in Salem, Oregon).

 


 

MATE Internship blog by Kristie Okimoto also from the September 2016 cruise. MATE = Marine Advanced Technology Education.

 


 

ARL in the Arctic on the Canadian Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE) in October and November 2016. ARL = Applied Research Laboratories at the University of Texas at Austin. Posts by Jason Sagers and Megan Ballard.

 


 

The Chief Scientist Training Program or Chief Scientist Workshop (CSW) in December 2016.

  • Seven posts, each by different scientists: Mary Dzaugis (University of Rhode Island), Jake Beam (Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences), Christina Wertman (University of Rhode Island), Tom Lankiewicz (University of California Santa Barbara), Anastasia Yanchilina (Weizmann Institute of Science), Joseph Niehaus, Thomas Kelly 

 


 

The Submesoscale MIxed-Layer Eddies Experiment (SMILE) from Northwest Research Associates, WHOI, and University of Washington Applied Physics Lab from March 3, 2017 to April 4, 2017. Posts by James Girton, Olga Mironenko, and Rosalind Echols. 

 


 

North Pacific Research Board (NPRB) Arctic Program in June 2017. Posts coordinated and mostly written by Brendan Smith. Outreach included other social media channels like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

  • The Arctic Integrated Ecosystem Research Program (IERP) will invest about $16 million in studying marine processes in the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas in 2017-2021. More info about the program here.

 


 

Arctic Winds, Fish, Fins and Feathers (ArcticWFFF) 3 week cruise that left Nome, Alaska August 26, 2017 and returned to Nome September 18, 2017. University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers studied how winds in the Beaufort Sea affect the food chain. Chief scientist: Carin Ashjian of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

 


 

Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) cruise in October 2017 deployed buoys off the coast of Oregon and Washington.


 

Videos:

  • Sikuliaq first launch in Marinette Marine, Wisconsin in October 2012.
  • Song of the Sikuliaq” by composer Emerson Eads and published in 2012.
  • LiveScience/Science Nation NSF video explaining the Sikuliaq in March 2013.
  • Video of Sikuliaq return from ice acceptance trials in February 2014. Return from Ludington, MI to Menominee River. Video by Scott Hartz.
  • Welland Canal Transit video from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario on Sikuliaq’s “maiden voyage” in July 2014.
  • Video of Sikuliaq while in Woods Hole by “Cape Cast” Eric Williams in August 2014.
  • Arctic Odyssey: Ice Capable” from June 2014 by the University of Alaska Museum of the North
  • Ice trials from March and April 2015:
  • Video aboard the Sikuliaq from “Live in Ketchikan” from March/April 2015
  • Lecture by Michael Castellini (Associate Dean, UAF Graduate School) in May 2015. “Polar Adventures: The Voyages of the Research Vessel Sikuliaq”. Uploaded by Geophysical Institute. (Length: 51:46) 
  • CTD Operations video and Winch Operations video published by Rapp Marine in August 2015.
  • UAF – 2015 – Aboard the Sikuliaq” in December 2015.
  • “2015 Sikuliaq Video and Update” published by the UNOLS office in January 2016.
  • Video of drone footage, storm footage, and deployment footage of Sikuliaq in ice: “Alextasy” by Pearly Kings and Queen (R/V Sikuliaq), uploaded by Kendall Beaver. From July 2016. 
  • 360 Video tours posted by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in October 2017.

 

Other individual outreach:

 


 

Ongoing outreach:

2 Replies to “Sikuliaq Outreach Catalog”

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